Frontal Dementia

                                                 Frontal Dementia

Frontotemporal Dementia is the most common type of dementia and it occurs in young adults under 60 years old. It is different from Alzheimer’s disease. It is more rare and happens earlier in life. Dementia is well-known one of the most popular mental health disorders in older adults. However, some researchers have recently found dementia that can occur in younger adults between 45-64 years old. The disease is called Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD). Frontotemporal Dementia is a group of related conditions resulting from degeneration of the temporal and frontal lobes of the brain. It is general term for a lot of unusual disorders that involve the frontal and temporal parts of the brain. The frontal lobes of the brain are located just behind the forehead and deal with speech, behavior, problem solving, planning and controlling of emotion. The temporal lobes are associated with recognizing faces, meaning of words, and naming the objects. The patients with Frontotemporal Dementia will change personality mood, behavior and have difficulty in speaking language and remembering objects. Unlike Alzheimer’s disease, Patients with Frontotemporal Dementia will show symptoms like apathy, ignoring people’s personal space, reckless spending, shoplifting, inappropriate sexual behavior and emotional blunting. Some patients will develop speed difficulties, poor judgment and issues with balance or movement. The healthcare professionals can’t find exactly what causes Frontotemporal Disorder, but it’s usually common cause of dementia. The nerve cells in the frontal and temporal lobes of the brain are lost and this causes the lobes to shrink.  Frontotemporal Dementia is not inherited. However, there is result 40% of people with Frontotemporal Dementia who have family history with diagnosis a neurodegenerative disease; thereby, there is possibility for people with the disease to develop the Frontotemporal Dementia. There is no specific test to recognize the Frontotemporal Dementia, except the medical professionals must wait for an autopsy to confirm it. It makes difficult to recognize the disease to prevent patients getting worse. There is no cure for Frontotemporal Dementia. Nevertheless, there is way to help managing the symptoms. Changing lifestyle like eating healthy, exercising more often and reducing stress are very helpful to patients with the disease. Some medications that will help also are antidepressant, antipsychotics. Encouraging patients’ family members and friends to support and give more love and care to the patients, helping with childcare, errands, and other tasks, also enouraging family members joining a support group for caregivers of people with frontotemporal disorders can help preparing outcomes.

https://health.usnews.com/health-care/patient-advice/articles/what-is-frontotemporal-dementia

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/frontotemporal-dementia/symptoms-causes/syc-20354737

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/providing-care-person-frontotemporal-disorder




Join linkr for free today!

linkr is easy to use and will make your teaching more interactive